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Archive for the ‘Bi- and multilingualism’ Category

Post your personal connections, cultural (mis)understandings, and/or responses to this week’s reading here.

And, again, for those of you who are especially interested in this topic, consider reading/reflecting on the recommended text:

The cultural divide of discourse: Understanding how English-language learners’ primary discourse influences acquisition of literacy. Lydia Mays. The Reading Teacher, 61[5]. 2008.

 

Added 2/28/11: I came across this short article on listening to our students and, though it doesn’t directly mention ELLs, many of the points included are quite applicable to ESL teaching.

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Enjoy the podcast by Kathryn Au on Culturally Responsive Instruction, which we weren’t able to listen to in class.

And here is this week’s recommended reading (Collier and Thomas) on dual language education.

Looking forward to reviewing your posts on bilingualism/biculturalism.

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We’ve been discussing the benefits of dual-language (i.e., two-way bilingual) programs and late-exit bilingual education programs. But… here’s some recent research from Johns Hopkins University that finds no significant differences between transitional bilingual education and structured English immersion. For a quick preview of the research see this Learning the Language blog post.

Note that the research doesn’t review dual-language models. Nonetheless, a shift from a focus on the language of instruction to appropriate pedagogy seems warranted.

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An apropos article on L1 attrition from Times of India—enjoy!

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Hope you’re finding this week’s articles by Stephen Krashen (and others) insightful and thought-provoking. Here’s a related article from the January 2009 edition of Language Magazine: A Conversation with Krashen.

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We’ve been discussing the importance of promoting bilingualism and biliteracy for our ELLs. This practice seems even more relevant, in consideration of this article review, which suggests that language preference “extends to the prenatal period”. If newborns can express a positive connection to particular language(s), then a child’s relationship to his/her primary language(s) must be of particular significance. Do you agree? And how does this affect our teaching?

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Another reason to respect and use primary languages in the mainstream classroom: Multilingualism Brings Communities Closer Together. What are your thoughts?

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